Keystone United Methodist (Formerly Broadway United Methodist)

Keystone (Broadway) United Methodist

406 W. 74th St. Kansas City, MO 64114.

Phone: (816) 363-4084

Email: thekeystonechurch@gmail.com.

http://www.thekeystonechurch.org

Jared Wheeler -Lead Pastor

All of the windows in the nave of Keystone (Broadway) United Methodist Church were fabricated by T. J. Gaytee Studios of Minneapolis, Minnesota and installed in 1926. The designers are currently unknown. However, some of the windows are clearly based on art that was created in other formats prior to the creation of these windows. The “A Light Unto the World” widow is an excellent example of this use of a previously created work of art as the source for the window’s figural element.

A Light Unto the World

I am come a light into the world, that whosoever believeth on me should not abide in darkness.

John 12:46

“Behold, I stand at the door and knock; if any man hear My voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with Me”.  Revelation 3:20

Based on a painting by William Holman Hunt

The Light of the World (1853–54) is an allegorical painting by William Holman Hunt representing the figure of Jesus preparing to knock on an overgrown and long-unopened door, illustrating Revelation 3:20. According to Hunt: “I painted the picture with what I thought, unworthy though I was, to be by Divine command, and not simply as a good Subject.”[1] The door in the painting has no handle, and can therefore be opened only from the inside, representing “the obstinately shut mind”.[2] Hunt, 50 years after painting it, felt he had to explain the symbolism.[3]

The original, painted at night in a makeshift hut at Worcester Park Farm in Surrey, is now in a side room off the large chapel at Keble College, Oxford.[4][5] Toward the end of his life, Hunt painted a life-size version, which was hung in St Paul’s Cathedral, London, after a world tour where the picture drew large crowds. Due to Hunt’s increasing infirmity, he was assisted in the completion of this version by English painter Edward Robert Hughes.

This painting inspired much popular devotion in the late Victorian period and inspired several musical works, including Sir Arthur Sullivan‘s 1873 oratorio The Light of the World.[6]

References

  1. Forbes, C (2001), “Images of Christ In Nineteenth-Century British Paintings In The Forbes Magazine Collection”, Magazine Antiques, December 2001.
  2. Hunt, W.H., Pre-Raphaelitism and the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, London: Macmillan, 1905, vol.1 p.350
  3. The Victorian Web
  4. Hunt, W.H., Pre-Raphaelitism and the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, London: Macmillan, 1905, vol.1 p.299-300.
  5. Nick Dalton (21 August 2012). Frommer’s England and the Best of Wales. John Wiley & Sons. pp. 349–. ISBN978-1-118-33137-8. Retrieved 19 January 2013.
  6. The Victorian Web

Retrieved from “http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Light_of_the_World_(painting)&oldid=593666965

“O Thou of Little Faith”

Matthew 14:31

“Behold the Man”

John 19:5

“I Ascend Unto my Father”

John 20:17

“And they shall call his name Emmanuel”

Matthew 1:23

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